Friday, June 26, 2009

Tiny Info of World War - II

World War II from a New Mexican Perspective!

When war broke out in Europe and Asia in 1939, the War Department suggested to the National Guard that their 111th Cavalry convert to another branch of service. The age of the horse as a combatant had passed. Thus, the officers and non-commissioned officers of the command jointly selected coast artillery. In 1940, the 111th was re-designated the 200th Coast Artillery Regiment (AA) and the 158th was reorganized as the 104th Anti-Tank battalion. On January 6, 1940, these units, along with the 120th Engineer Regiment, were called to active duty for a one-year training period that became the prelude to some of the earliest combat experienced by American troops in World War II.

New Mexico in the 1940s also began to play a critical role in the emerging relationship between science and the military, which would grow rapidly in the decades to follow. This started with the testing of the variable-timed, radio, proximity-fused artillery shells that would be crucial to protecting the Navy's ships from Kamikazes and to the Army's defense of Bastogne, Belgium in 1944. Airplanes were suspended over the desert mesa near Kirtland between the tallest wooden towers in the world and used for targets.

The importance of the proximity fuze to the successful outcome of the Second World War is best stated by those who witnessed its effectiveness.

James V. Forrestal, Secretary of the Navy said, "The proximity fuze has helped blaze the trail to Japan. Without the protection this ingenious device has given the surface ships of the Fleet, our westward push could not have been so swift and the cost in men and ships would have been immeasurably greater."

Prime Minister, Winston S. Churchill was quoted with "These so-called proximity fuzes, made in the United States. . , proved potent against the small unmanned aircraft (V-1) with which we were assailed in 1944."

And Commanding General of the Third Army, George S. Patton said, "The funny fuze won the Battle of the Bulge for us. I think that when all armies get this shell we will have to devise some new method of warfare."

Thursday, June 25, 2009

Wednesday, June 24, 2009

Tuesday, June 23, 2009

Sinus Infections

Can Cause Toxic Shock in Kids:

Sinus infections may be a primary factor in about 20 percent of toxic shock syndrome cases in children, a new study has found.

Fever, rash and low blood pressure are among the signs of toxic shock syndrome, widely regarded as a disease associated with tampon use and menstruation, according to background information in the study.

"Although not as publicized, numerous other risk factors have been established for toxic shock syndrome in association with focal infections, such as surgical wound infections [notably after rhinologic surgery and nasal packing], postpartum and postabortion infections, and a wide variety of connective tissue lesions," Dr. Kenny H. Chan, of the University of Colorado School of Medicine and The Children's Hospital of Denver, and colleagues, reported in the study.

The researchers analyzed the medical records of 76 children, average age 10, identified as having toxic shock syndrome. Of those children, 23 were also diagnosed with either acute or chronic rhinosinusitis -- infection and inflammation in the sinus passages surrounding the nose.

Ten of the 23 children with toxic shock syndrome and rhinosinusitis were admitted to the intensive care unit, four required medications to increase blood pressure and six underwent surgery, according to the study published in the June issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology--Head & Neck Surgery.

"This study illustrates several salient points concerning toxic shock syndrome and rhinosinusitis in children," Chan and colleagues wrote. "First, rhinosinusitis as the primary culprit in the pathogenesis of toxic shock syndrome is not a sporadic phenomenon. In fact, the frequency of this combination…[in the study] is an impressive 21 percent."

The researchers concluded that "it is imperative that physicians, particularly those who are providing intensive care to children, recognize that rhinosinusitis can be the sole cause of toxic shock syndrome in children. Prompt imaging studies of the sinuses is mandatory when no apparent cause of toxic shock syndrome is found. Once rhinosinusitis is diagnosed, timely otolaryngology referral should be obtained, and sinus culture and lavage should be considered if the clinical condition warrants it."

Monday, June 22, 2009

Friday, June 19, 2009

Air Quality & How You Can Help?

How Good is Your Air?

Health effects of ozone pollution. Did you know that 10 to 20 percent of all summertime respiratory-related hospital visits in some areas of the U.S. are associated with ozone pollution? Motor vehicle exhaust, gasoline vapors, and chemical solvents are major sources of ozone, which usually forms in hot weather. Ozone pollution can affect anyone who spends time outdoors in the summer, particularly children, the elderly, outdoor workers and people exercising. Repeated exposure to ozone pollution may cause permanent damage to the lungs. Even low ozone levels can trigger health problems in some people when it is inhaled; these can include chest pains, coughing, nausea, throat irritation, and congestion.

How Your Actions Can Help:

By making some fairly simple changes in your daily or weekly routine, you can help to clean the air. For instance:

  • Try taking an alternative form of transportation to work, such as a bus, train, bike, or even walking. This simple action can reduce carbon dioxide emissions by an estimated 1,500 pounds each year.

  • Look for the "Energy Star" label when you buy new appliances. Depending on the appliance, products with this label will consume between 13% and 40% less energy than conventional appliances.

  • Enroll in a green energy program. More and more utilities across the country are offering consumers the option of having some or all of their household or business energy purchased from renewable energy resources such as solar, wind and biomass.

Thursday, June 18, 2009

Breast Cancer

Top 10 Causes of Death for Women in the United States

Aside from non-melanoma skin cancer, breast cancer is the most common form of cancer in women. Breast cancer is the number one cause of cancer death in Hispanic women. It is the second most common cause of cancer death in white, black, Asian/Pacific Islander, and American Indian/Alaska Native women.


In 2005 (the most recent year numbers are available)

  • 186,467 women and 1,764 men were diagnosed with breast cancer
  • 41,116 women and 375 men died from breast cancer

Wednesday, June 17, 2009

James Buchanan - Did U Know?

Did You Know?
The only president that never married. The White House hostess was his niece, Harriet Lane. In 1819, Buchanan became engaged to Ann Coleman. A misunderstanding took place and their engagement was broken. A short time later, Ann died. Buchanan vowed he would never marry.

Born into a well-to-do Pennsylvania family in 1791, Buchanan, a graduate of Dickinson College, was gifted as a debater and learned in the law.

He was elected five times to the House of Representatives; then, after an interlude as Minister to Russia, served for a decade in the Senate. He became Polk's Secretary of State and Pierce's Minister to Great Britain. Service abroad helped to bring him the Democratic nomination in 1856 because it had exempted him from involvement in bitter domestic controversies.

As President-elect, Buchanan thought the crisis would disappear if he maintained a sectional balance in his appointments and could persuade the people to accept constitutional law as the Supreme Court interpreted it. The Court was considering the legality of restricting slavery in the territories, and two justices hinted to Buchanan what the decision would be.

Sunday, June 14, 2009

What is Influenza?

The flu is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses. It can cause mild to severe illness, and at times can lead to death. The best way to prevent the flu is by getting a flu vaccination each fall.

Every year in the Arizona, on average:

  • 5% to 20% of the population gets the flu;
  • more than 4,000 people are hospitalized from flu complications, and;
  • about 700 people die from flu.

    Some people, such as older people, young children, and people with certain health conditions, are at high risk for serious flu complications.

Symptoms of Flu

Symptoms of flu include:

  • fever (usually high)
  • headache
  • extreme tiredness
  • dry cough
  • sore throat
  • runny or stuffy nose
  • muscle aches
  • Stomach symptoms, such as nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea, also can occur but are more common in children than adults

Complications of Flu

Complications of flu can include bacterial pneumonia, ear infections, sinus infections, dehydration, and worsening of chronic medical conditions, such as congestive heart failure, asthma, or diabetes.

How Flu Spreads

Flu viruses spread mainly from person to person through coughing or sneezing of people with influenza. Sometimes people may become infected by touching something with flu viruses on it and then touching their mouth or nose. Most healthy adults may be able to infect others beginning 1 day before symptoms develop and up to 5 days after becoming sick. That means that you may be able to pass on the flu to someone else before you know you are sick, as well as while you are sick.

Friday, June 12, 2009

First Aid for Electrical Shock

If you believe someone has been electrocuted take the following steps:

1. Look first. Don't touch. The person may still be in contact with the electrical source. Touching the person may pass the current through you.

2. Call or have someone else call 911 or emergency medical help.

3. Turn off the source of electricity if possible. If not, move the source away from you and the affected person using a nonconducting object made of cardboard, plastic or wood.

4. Once the person is free of the source of electricity, check the person's breathing and pulse. If either has stopped or seems dangerously slow or shallow, begin cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) immediately.

5. If the person is faint or pale or shows other signs of shock, lay the person down with the head slightly lower than the trunk of his or her body and the legs elevated.

6. Don't touch burns, break blisters, or remove burned clothing. Electrical shock may cause burns inside the body, so be sure the person is taken to a doctor.

Monday, June 08, 2009

The River Nile

The River Nile is the longest in the world, stretching for 4,187 miles. The Nile flows from south to north and is formed by three major tributaries: the White Nile, the Blue Nile and the Atbara.

The Blue Nile has its source in the highlands of the African country of Ethiopia, by Lake Tana. The runoff from spring rain and melting snow caused the annual summer flood of the Nile that the Egyptians depended on for water to irrigate their crops, and deposit fertile top soil.

Just north of Khartoum the combined White and Blue Nile meet their final major tributary, the Atbara which also has its source in the Ethiopian highlands.The Nile then plunges into a canyon. Before the construction of the Aswan High Dam; the Nile rolled through a series of six rapids, called cataracts, between northern Sudan and southern Egypt. Since construction of the dam, the river has gradually changed its course.

North of Cairo, the Nile splits into two branches (or distributaries), the Rosetta Branch to the west and the Damietta to the east. Lake Nasser is a man-made lake created by the construction of the Aswan High Dam, opened in 1971. The dam was built to regulate the flow of the River Nile , and thus benefit the region's inhabitants. However, technology often also disrupts a local ecosystem, the life and nature it affects.

The canyon that was once behind where the dam is now, was flooded after the dam was built. Before the region was flooded for the dam, some Ancient sites were carefully moved. Others were permanently covered and destroyed by the water. Lake Nasser stretches over a distance of 312 miles. Gone are the days when Egyptians worry that the Nile will flood too high, destroying their crops; or fall too low, not providing proper irrigation. To enjoy the benefits of a steady river flow, thousands of peoples homes were submerged when the dam went into operation and Lake Nasser was formed.

The Aswan High Dam has caused other changes. The water surface of the lake has reduced the average temperature in the region. The dam has also harnessed the water for the production of electricity and navigation has been improved.Furthermore, the Nile is no longer flowing strongly enough to keep salt water from the Mediterranean Sea from forcing its way up the Nile.In one generation, thousands of years of life along the River Nile have been permanently altered.

Monday, June 01, 2009


The motherboard is the most essential component of the system unit's computing abilities. Coming in several designs and shapes, the most flexible and popular design is the ATX which can happily slot into desktop, full tower and mini-tower cases with excellent design for cooling, and input/output connections. Two other major designs, NLX and WTX are worth briefly noting. The NLX design has integrated Ethernet and known as being the easiest to service, making it very popular among technicians! WTX is a fairly new design (first released 1998) and is orientated towards mid-range workstations.

The basic components of a motherboard are as follows: the ROM BIOS (Basic Input/Output System), the processor or CPU, Floppy Disk and IDE or SCSI connectors (Hard Disk Drivers/CD Drives), slots for memory chips, slots for extra cards (e.g., video cards, internal modems, adapter cards), input/Output connectors for keyboard, mouse, monitor, printers, scanners, speakers etc. IDE or SCSI Data cables connect the motherboard to the disk drives. The entire board is etched, in a manner that many find aesthetically quite beautiful, for the transfer of electricity and data.

From turning on the power the supply provides electricity to the motherboard. The BIOS is loaded into the CPU which then searches for a disk operating system. If that loads correctly, the user can issue instructions through input devices connected to the motherboard and with results sent via the motherboard to output devices.

Friday, May 29, 2009

What is a healthy weight?

Maintaining a healthy weight may reduce the risk of many chronic diseases. It may also help you move better and stay mentally sharp. If you are underweight, overweight, or obese, you are at risk for certain health problems. Ask your health care provider about a healthy weight for you. If you start to gain or lose weight and do not know why, your health care provider can tell you if this change is healthy for you.

Health Risks of Being Underweight

  • poor memory
  • decreased immunity
  • osteoporosis (bone loss)
  • decreased muscle strength
  • hypothermia (lowered body temperature)
  • constipation

Health Risks of Being Overweight or Obese

  • type 2 diabetes
  • high blood pressure
  • high blood cholesterol
  • coronary heart disease
  • stroke
  • some types of cancer
  • gallbladder disease

If you already have one or more of these conditions, ask your health care provider if a modest weight loss (5 to 10 percent of your body weight) could help you feel better or need less medicine.

If you need to lose weight, make sure that you reduce your total calories, but do not reduce your nutrient intake. Do not try to lose weight unless your health care provider tells you to.

Wednesday, May 27, 2009

Monday, May 25, 2009

Great Wall of China

The Great Wall of China is a series of stone and earthen fortifications in northern China, built, rebuilt, and maintained between the 5th century BC and the 16th century to protect the northern borders of the Chinese Empire from Xiongnu attacks during various successive dynasties. Since the 5th century BC, several walls have been built that were referred to as the Great Wall. One of the most famous is the wall built between 220–206 BC by the first Emperor of China, Qin Shi Huang.

The Great Wall currently stretches over approximately 6,400 km from Shanhaiguan in the east to Lop Nur in the west, along an arc that roughly delineates the southern edge of Inner Mongolia, but stretches to over 6,700 km in total; a more recent archaeological survey using advanced technologies points out that the entire Great Wall, with all of its branches, stretches for 8,851.8 km.

At its peak, the Ming Wall was guarded by more than one million men. It has been estimated that somewhere in the range of 2 to 3 million Chinese died as part of the centuries-long project of building the wall.

Friday, May 22, 2009


A helicopter is an aircraft that is lifted and propelled by one or more horizontal rotors, each rotor consisting of two or more rotor blades. Helicopters are classified as rotorcraft or rotary-wing aircraft to distinguish them from fixed-wing aircraft because the helicopter achieves lift with the rotor blades which rotate around a mast.

Basic anatomy of a Helicopter

Rotor System

The Main Rotor consists of three blades that are made of composite materials. They are easily attatched and removed for trailering or storage.


A cockpit or flight deck is the area, usually near the front of an aircraft, from which a pilot controls the aircraft. Most modern cockpits are enclosed, except on some small aircraft, and cockpits on large airliners are also physically separated from the cabin.


The cabin of the helicopter accomodates two crew members comfortably. The width of the cabin at shoulder level is 1200 mm. The large windows provide excellent visability in all directions. Perforated leather seating is standard equipment. No t-bar here! Dual cyclic controls provide the ultimate feel and control.

Tail Rotor

A small rotor at the back of rotorcraft.It blows air sideways to keep the rotorcraft from spinning.It is also used to turn the rotorcraft.

Wednesday, May 20, 2009

Healthy Snacks


Almond milk is a milky drink made from ground almonds. Unlike animal milk, almond milk contains no cholesterol or lactose and can be used as a substitute for animal milk in many recipes. Almond milk is also completely vegan. Commercial almond milk products come in plain, vanilla, or chocolate flavors. They are often enriched with vitamins. It can also be made at home by combining ground almonds with water in a blender. Vanilla flavoring and sweeteners are often added. However, users should be cautious not to use bitter almonds, since the combination of bitter almonds and water releases cyanide.For the weight conscious, unsweetened almond milk is lower in calories than cow's milk or soy milk.

Dried fruit

Dried fruit is fruit that has been dried, either naturally or through use of a machine, such as a food dehydrator. Raisins, prunes, and dates are examples of popular dried fruits. Other fruits such as apples, apricots, bananas, cherries, cranberries, figs, kiwi, mangoes, pawpaw, peaches, pears, persimmons, pineapples, strawberries, and tomatoes may also be dried. In addition to dried whole fruits, fruit puree can be dried in sheets to make fruit leather.Drying preserves fruit, even in the absence of refrigeration, and significantly lengthens its shelf life. When fresh fruit is unavailable, impractical, or out of season, dried fruit can provide an alternative. It is often added to baking mixes and breakfast cereals.

Dried Peas

A pea is most commonly the small spherical seed or the seed-pod of the legume Pisum sativum. Each pod contains several peas. Although it is botanically a fruit,it is treated as a vegetable in cooking. The name is also used to describe other edible seeds from the Fabaceae such as the pigeon pea, the cowpea, and the seeds from several species of Lathyrus.The wild pea is restricted to the Mediterranean basin and the Near East. The earliest archaeological finds of peas come from Neolithic Syria, Turkey and Jordan. In Egypt, early finds come from c. 4800–4400 BC in the delta area, and from c. 3800–3600 BC in Upper Egypt. The pea was also present in 5th millennium BC Georgia. Further east, the finds are younger. Pea remains were retrieved from Afghanistan c. 2000 BC. They were present in 2250–1750 BC Harappa Pakistan and north-west India, from the older phases of this culture onward. In the second half of the 2nd millennium BC this pulse crop appears in the Gangetic basin and southern India.

Sunday, May 17, 2009

Top 5 Beaches

Cox's Bazar: Bangladesh

Cox's Bazar is a town, a fishing port and district headquarter in Bangladesh. It is known for its wide sandy beach which is claimed to be the world's longest natural sandy sea beach.

It is an unbroken 125 km sandy sea beach with a gentle slope. Since the rise and fall of the tide here is not great, it is a good place for sea bathing. It is located 150 km south of Chittagong. Cox’s Bazar is also known by the name "Panowa", the literal translation of which means "yellow flower". Its other old name was "Palongkee". The modern Cox's Bazar derives its name from Captain Cox , an officer serving in British India. In the 18th century, an officer of British East India Company, Captain Hiram Cox was appointed as the Superintendent of Palongkee outpost after Warren Hastings became the Governor of Bengal.

Big Sur Beach: California, USA

Big Sur is a sparsely populated region of the central California coast where the Santa Lucia Mountains rise abruptly from the Pacific Ocean. The name "Big Sur" is derived from the original Spanish-language "el sur grande", meaning "the big south", or from "el país grande del sur", "the big country of the south". The terrain offers stunning views, making Big Sur a popular tourist destination. Big Sur's Cone Peak is the highest coastal mountain in the contiguous 48 states, ascending nearly a mile (5,155 feet/1.6 km) above sea level, only three miles (4.8 km) from the ocean.

Big Sur has no specific boundaries, many definitions of the area include the 90 miles of coastline between the Carmel River and San Carpoforo Creek, and extend about 20 miles inland to the eastern foothills of the Santa Lucias. Other sources limit the eastern border to the coastal flanks of these mountains, only three to 12 miles inland.

Pink Sand Beach: Bahamas

Harbour Island is an island and administrative district in the Bahamas. Harbour Island is set off the north east coast of Eleuthera Island. The only town on the island is Dunmore Town, named after the former Governor of the Bahamas, the Earl of Dunmore (1786-1798), who had a summer residence on Harbour Island.

Harbour Island is famous for its pink sand beaches which are found all along the east side of the island. The island is accessible by plane through North Eleuthera Airport, followed by a short water taxi ride from neighbouring North Eleuthera. Harbour Island is a popular holiday destination for Americans. Known as Briland to the locals, Harbour Island is colourful with New England-style buildings and flower lined streets. Harbour Island is part of the Out Islands of the Bahamas.

Paracas Beach: Peru

One country worth visiting is Peru because it offers lots of scenic views. One of which is the Paracas Beach. On the beach, you'll have a chance to encounter pelicans who roam along the beach.

Paracas Beach belongs to the desert peninsula Paracas on the south coast of Peru. Most of the Peninsula is part of the Paracas National Reservation.

Boracay Beach: Philippines

You will surely enjoy your stay on this island paradise. Boracay Beach is one of the country's most popular tourist destinations. It is approximately 300 km south of Manila.

Boracay is regarded as "the finest beach of all Asia". Likewise, popularly known as, "the number one tropical beach in the world". Everyone will surely enjoy swimming and sunbathing on its 4 kilometer "white sand beach". You will definitely like this island paradise. This place is also ideal for scuba diving and snorkeling. You can enjoy banana boat riding among many other things.

Wednesday, May 13, 2009

Longest bus in the world

The world’s longest bus has been presented Shanghai's Busworld Asia 2007, it works only in cities without corners or the other way would be to drive from one block to another without turning.The price? USD250,000 and this is not cheap at all, considering the fact that it is a China made bus.This 83 foot (25 meter) long bus has a capacity of 300 passengers and 40 seats, is divided into 3 compartments, due to this its speed limit is up to 51mph max (82 km/h), probably to avoid any unwanted incident.

But then with that kind of speed this bus would cause traffic jam that might clog up the city, one of the reason being that it is almost impossible to over take the bus.The world’s longest bus will be primarily used for traveling between in Beijing and Hangzhou.This attractive bus does come at a high price - between $155,000 to $250,000

Wednesday, May 06, 2009

December 26, 2004

The 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake was an undersea earthquake that occurred at 00:58:53 UTC on December 26, 2004, with an epicentre off the west coast of Sumatra, Indonesia. It is known by the scientific community as the Great Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, and the following tsunami is known as the Asian Tsunami or the Boxing Day Tsunami.

The earthquake was caused by subduction and triggered a series of devastating tsunami along the coasts of most landmasses bordering the Indian Ocean, killing more than 225,000 people in eleven countries, and inundating coastal communities with waves up to 30 meters (100 feet) high. It was one of the deadliest natural disasters in recorded history. Indonesia, Sri Lanka, India, and Thailand were hardest hit.

Wednesday, April 29, 2009

Audi R8

The Audi R8 is a sports-prototype race car introduced in 2000 for sports car racing as a redevelopment of their Audi R8R (open top LMP) and Audi R8C (closed top LMGTP) used in 1999. It is one of the most successful sports cars ever (alongside such greats as the Porsche 956/962) having won the prestigious 24 Hours of Le Mans in 2000, 2001, 2002, 2004, and 2005 (five of the seven years it competed). A streak of six straight Le Mans victories was broken-up only by the Bentley Speed 8 (powered by the same V8 twin-turbo engine) in 2003, when the R8 finished 3rd.

The petrol-powered Audi R8 race car was replaced by the new Audi R10 TDI Diesel in 2006; however, the need to further develop the R10 meant that the R8 saw action in a few races leading up to Le Mans.

Monday, April 27, 2009

The Moon

The Moon, of course, has been known since prehistoric times. It is the second brightest object in the sky after the Sun. As the Moon orbits around the Earth once per month, the angle between the Earth, the Moon and the Sun changes; we see this as the cycle of the Moon's phases. The time between successive new moons is 29.5 days (709 hours), slightly different from the Moon's orbital period (measured against the stars) since the Earth moves a significant distance in its orbit around the Sun in that time.

The Moon was first visited by the Soviet spacecraft Luna 2 in 1959. It is the only extraterrestrial body to have been visited by humans.

The first landing was on July 20, 1969 the last was in December 1972. The Moon is also the only body from which samples have been returned to Earth. In the summer of 1994, the Moon was very extensively mapped by the little spacecraft Clementine and again in 1999 by Lunar Prospector.

The gravitational forces between the Earth and the Moon cause some interesting effects. The most obvious is the tides. The Moon's gravitational attraction is stronger on the side of the Earth nearest to the Moon and weaker on the opposite side. Since the Earth, and particularly the oceans, is not perfectly rigid it is stretched out along the line toward the Moon. From our perspective on the Earth's surface we see two small bulges, one in the direction of the Moon and one directly opposite. The effect is much stronger in the ocean water than in the solid crust so the water bulges are higher.

Wednesday, April 22, 2009

Home Design

At Look4Design you can easily navigate to view a wide variety of exhibitors in the area of home and interior design.The products are shown using a unique technology which makes them easy to view.The products are shown using a unique technology which makes them easy to view.

You must first decide what type of home to build. House styles today are as varied as those who live in them, offering you a banquet of ideas from which to borrow.

When creating a list of criteria for your home design, start with the basics: the number of bedrooms,the number of family areas, the choice between a formal dining room or a more open, community eating area, porch or deck styles for your home’s entrances and the size of your garage.

Monday, April 20, 2009

Tallest Church in the world

Ulm Cathedral (German: Ulmer Münster, literally: minster) is a Lutheran church, the tallest church in the world, with a steeple measuring 161.53 m (530 ft) and containing 768 steps. Located in Ulm, Germany, the church is not a cathedral in the technical ecclesiastical sense, as it has never been the seat of a bishop

Today this giant Gothic church measures an astounding 464 ft long and is 159 feet wide. The massive interior has the capacity to hold 30,000 people.

This great work of architecture also houses important pieces of art. The 15th century choir stalls by Jörg Syrlin the Elder enjoy world-wide acclaim, in particular the carved busts which have gone down as masterpieces in the history of art.

Saturday, April 18, 2009

James Bond

Barry Nelson, the very first actor to portray Ian Fleming's super spy James Bond on screen has passed away at the age of 89 according to a recent report in Variety. For years, if I wanted to wow someone with some trivia about a little known actor who played James Bond I'd whip a little info about George Lazenby on them.

James David Graham Niven was born on the 1st of March, 1910 in London, England. After attending a highly awarded British Independent School, Niven joined the Royal Army in hopes of glory and the service of his country. Though he did not particular enjoy his time on the Royal Army, he did manage to keep up his appearance, branding the name the "Officer and Gentleman"

Actor George Lazenby was the second James Bond and starred in only one film, "On Her Majesty's Secret Service" in 1969.

The 3rd James Bond film, following 1963's From Russia With Love.
Starring Sean Connery as James Bond, Honor Blackman as Pussy Galore, Shirley Eaton as Jill Masterson (the girl who is painted gold), Gert Frobe as the villain, Auric Goldfinger, and Harold Sakata as the henchman Oddjob. Directed by Guy Hamilton.

Pierce Brendan Brosnan OBE (born May 16, 1953) is an Irish actor and producer, who currently has United States citizenship. He is best known for portraying James Bond in four films: GoldenEye, Tomorrow Never Dies, The World Is Not Enough, and Die Another Day.

Three MI6 agents have died - in New Orleans, on the island of San Monique and in Harlem, New York. M dispatches 007 to investigate. Bond's arrival in Harlem is predicted by a medium named Solitaire, and he is immediately a marked man.

Timothy Dalton's James Bond was a major departure from Roger Moore's. Dalton went back to the Fleming source novels for his inspiration. His Bond was dark, moody, flinty and focused on the job at hand, a job that he sometimes found distasteful.

Daniel Craig is the sixth actor to portray James Bond, staring with Casino Royale and is slated to star as James Bond until 2012. Many people didn't agree with the producers choice that Craig was going to be Bond.