Friday, June 26, 2009

Tiny Info of World War - II

World War II from a New Mexican Perspective!

When war broke out in Europe and Asia in 1939, the War Department suggested to the National Guard that their 111th Cavalry convert to another branch of service. The age of the horse as a combatant had passed. Thus, the officers and non-commissioned officers of the command jointly selected coast artillery. In 1940, the 111th was re-designated the 200th Coast Artillery Regiment (AA) and the 158th was reorganized as the 104th Anti-Tank battalion. On January 6, 1940, these units, along with the 120th Engineer Regiment, were called to active duty for a one-year training period that became the prelude to some of the earliest combat experienced by American troops in World War II.

New Mexico in the 1940s also began to play a critical role in the emerging relationship between science and the military, which would grow rapidly in the decades to follow. This started with the testing of the variable-timed, radio, proximity-fused artillery shells that would be crucial to protecting the Navy's ships from Kamikazes and to the Army's defense of Bastogne, Belgium in 1944. Airplanes were suspended over the desert mesa near Kirtland between the tallest wooden towers in the world and used for targets.

The importance of the proximity fuze to the successful outcome of the Second World War is best stated by those who witnessed its effectiveness.

James V. Forrestal, Secretary of the Navy said, "The proximity fuze has helped blaze the trail to Japan. Without the protection this ingenious device has given the surface ships of the Fleet, our westward push could not have been so swift and the cost in men and ships would have been immeasurably greater."

Prime Minister, Winston S. Churchill was quoted with "These so-called proximity fuzes, made in the United States. . , proved potent against the small unmanned aircraft (V-1) with which we were assailed in 1944."

And Commanding General of the Third Army, George S. Patton said, "The funny fuze won the Battle of the Bulge for us. I think that when all armies get this shell we will have to devise some new method of warfare."

Thursday, June 25, 2009

Wednesday, June 24, 2009

Tuesday, June 23, 2009

Sinus Infections

Can Cause Toxic Shock in Kids:

Sinus infections may be a primary factor in about 20 percent of toxic shock syndrome cases in children, a new study has found.

Fever, rash and low blood pressure are among the signs of toxic shock syndrome, widely regarded as a disease associated with tampon use and menstruation, according to background information in the study.

"Although not as publicized, numerous other risk factors have been established for toxic shock syndrome in association with focal infections, such as surgical wound infections [notably after rhinologic surgery and nasal packing], postpartum and postabortion infections, and a wide variety of connective tissue lesions," Dr. Kenny H. Chan, of the University of Colorado School of Medicine and The Children's Hospital of Denver, and colleagues, reported in the study.

The researchers analyzed the medical records of 76 children, average age 10, identified as having toxic shock syndrome. Of those children, 23 were also diagnosed with either acute or chronic rhinosinusitis -- infection and inflammation in the sinus passages surrounding the nose.

Ten of the 23 children with toxic shock syndrome and rhinosinusitis were admitted to the intensive care unit, four required medications to increase blood pressure and six underwent surgery, according to the study published in the June issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology--Head & Neck Surgery.

"This study illustrates several salient points concerning toxic shock syndrome and rhinosinusitis in children," Chan and colleagues wrote. "First, rhinosinusitis as the primary culprit in the pathogenesis of toxic shock syndrome is not a sporadic phenomenon. In fact, the frequency of this combination…[in the study] is an impressive 21 percent."

The researchers concluded that "it is imperative that physicians, particularly those who are providing intensive care to children, recognize that rhinosinusitis can be the sole cause of toxic shock syndrome in children. Prompt imaging studies of the sinuses is mandatory when no apparent cause of toxic shock syndrome is found. Once rhinosinusitis is diagnosed, timely otolaryngology referral should be obtained, and sinus culture and lavage should be considered if the clinical condition warrants it."

Monday, June 22, 2009

Friday, June 19, 2009

Air Quality & How You Can Help?

How Good is Your Air?

Health effects of ozone pollution. Did you know that 10 to 20 percent of all summertime respiratory-related hospital visits in some areas of the U.S. are associated with ozone pollution? Motor vehicle exhaust, gasoline vapors, and chemical solvents are major sources of ozone, which usually forms in hot weather. Ozone pollution can affect anyone who spends time outdoors in the summer, particularly children, the elderly, outdoor workers and people exercising. Repeated exposure to ozone pollution may cause permanent damage to the lungs. Even low ozone levels can trigger health problems in some people when it is inhaled; these can include chest pains, coughing, nausea, throat irritation, and congestion.

How Your Actions Can Help:

By making some fairly simple changes in your daily or weekly routine, you can help to clean the air. For instance:

  • Try taking an alternative form of transportation to work, such as a bus, train, bike, or even walking. This simple action can reduce carbon dioxide emissions by an estimated 1,500 pounds each year.

  • Look for the "Energy Star" label when you buy new appliances. Depending on the appliance, products with this label will consume between 13% and 40% less energy than conventional appliances.

  • Enroll in a green energy program. More and more utilities across the country are offering consumers the option of having some or all of their household or business energy purchased from renewable energy resources such as solar, wind and biomass.

Thursday, June 18, 2009

Breast Cancer

Top 10 Causes of Death for Women in the United States

Aside from non-melanoma skin cancer, breast cancer is the most common form of cancer in women. Breast cancer is the number one cause of cancer death in Hispanic women. It is the second most common cause of cancer death in white, black, Asian/Pacific Islander, and American Indian/Alaska Native women.


In 2005 (the most recent year numbers are available)

  • 186,467 women and 1,764 men were diagnosed with breast cancer
  • 41,116 women and 375 men died from breast cancer